JosephSmithSr.
So shall it be with my father: he shall be
called a prince over his posterity, holding
the keys of the patriarchal priesthood over the kingdom of God on earth, even the Church
of the Latter Day Saints, and he shall sit in the general assembly of patriarchs, even in
council with the Ancient of Days when he shall sit and all the patriarchs with him and shall
enjoy his right and authority under the direction of the Ancient of Days.
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MACK, John Jr.

MACK, John Jr.  Additional Information on MACK, John Jr. - I19686

Male 1653 - 1721  (67 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name MACK, John 
    Suffix Jr. 
    Born 6 Mar 1653  Inveresk, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    _TAG Set Family Search - 2015 
    Buried Feb 1721  Lyme, New London Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 24 Feb 1721  Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I19686  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith | Joseph Sr.
    Last Modified 5 May 2017 

    Father MACKGAHYE, John   Additional Information on MACKGAHYE, John - I44080,   b. 11 Nov 1627, Inveresk, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1678, Dunfermline, Fifeshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years) 
    Mother MCDONALD, Lady Marian ,   b. 1625, Achtriochtan, Glencoe, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Dec 1678, Glantree, Argyle, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years) 
    Married Abt 1645  Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Family ID F7997  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 MACGREGOR, Anne ,   b. 1660, Balquhidder, Perthshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 1675  Balquhidder, Perthshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married Glencarnoch, Roromore, Scotland.
    Last Modified 13 Sep 2017 
    Family ID F7996  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 BAGLEY, Sarah ,   b. 2 Mar 1663, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 4 May 1733, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 70 years) 
    Married 5 Apr 1681  Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 8, 9
    Children 
    +1. MACK, John III ,   b. 29 Apr 1682, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1734, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
     2. MACK, Sarah ,   b. 22 Aug 1684, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jan 1775, Haddam, Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
     3. MACK, Elizabeth ,   b. 28 Oct 1686, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Mar 1749, Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
     4. MACK, Lydia ,   b. 28 May 1689, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Feb 1716, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 26 years)
     5. MACK, Deacon Josiah ,   b. 11 Nov 1691, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Nov 1769, Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     6. MACK, Orlando ,   b. 16 Dec 1693, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jan 1768, Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     7. MACK, Jonathon   Additional Information on MACK, Jonathon - I19694,   b. 28 Nov 1695, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Dec 1768, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
    +8. MACK, Elder Ebenezer ,   b. 8 Dec 1697, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 May 1792, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)
     9. MACK, Mary ,   b. 10 Nov 1699, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1793, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
     10. MACK, Rebecca ,   b. 17 Sep 1703, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Nov 1732  (Age 29 years)
     11. MACK, Johanna ,   b. 17 Sep 1703, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1750  (Age > 48 years)
     12. MACK, Deborah ,   b. 11 Oct 1706, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Feb 1776, Hadlyme, Middlesex, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
     13. MACK, Samuel ,   b. 1707, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Dec 1768, Hanover, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
    Last Modified 13 Sep 2017 
    Family ID F7989  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 6 Mar 1653 - Inveresk, Midlothian, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1675 - Balquhidder, Perthshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Feb 1721 - Lyme, New London Connecticut, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 24 Feb 1721 - Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Mack Family Crest
    Mack Crest.jpg

  • Notes 
    • The Mack and Sine Families - by Edward P. Mack (Published 1950) "Origin of Mack: The name of Mack is of ancient Scottish origin. It is originally used as a Christian name, being later adopted as a surname by the sons of one so-called. It is found in ancient British and early American records in the records in the various spellings of Mac, Mec, Mick, Mack, and others, of which the last mentioned is that used in America today. Families of this name were to be found at early dates in the Counties of Berwick, Scotland and Norfolk County, England, and at later dates in various parts of Ireland as well. They were of the landed gentry and yeomanry of Great Britain. (John Mack is referred to as a portioner (land owner) of Hinselwood.) According to Rooney's Genealogical History of Irish Families, the Mack family descended from Milesius, King of Spain, (who according to legend invaded Ireland in 1700 BC) through the line of his son Heremon. The founder of the family was Cola Meann, son of Eocha Dubhlein (RIN 822), or Dowlen, brother of Fiacha Straiventine, first King of Connaught of the race of Heremon and son of Carbre Liffeachair (RIN 814) King of Ireland, AD 264. The possessions of the family were located in the present counties of Mayo and Sligo. Traveled from London to Boston harbor at age 16. It is thought that John Mack shortened his name. Carried with him a family crest with the motto "In hope and labor I go." -------------------- Joseph Smith: An American Prophet: Joseph Smith's Forebears, pg. 25 and 26. -------------------- Four John Macks in the records of the National Archives in Scotland - 1.14 Oct 1653 Johne Macky son of Johne Macky and Barbara Schort. Born in Edinburgh, Midlothian 2.4 July 1654 John Mace son of John Mace and Margaret Wilson - Fife, the Parish Kirkcaldy. 3.8 Mar 1654 John Macky son of Patrik Macky born Angus the Parish of Liff, Benvie and Invergowrie. 4.19 June 1659 John Mack son of Andrew Mack born in Berwick, Parish of Gordon. (Probably) Secondary sources for various dates given for John Mack do not reference any original source. All subsequent books and articles quote the following secondary sources: -- American Ancestry: (1890) Vol. 2 pg. 76; Vol. 5 p. 66 published 1914 -- Five Colonial Families (John Mack emigrated from Scotland about 1680.) -- Journal of the State of Illinois Historical Society (published 1915) Vol. 1 p. 343 -- Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America (John Mack Scotch Covenanter) -- History of Town of Gilsum, New Hampshire p. 357 year 1881 -- Scotch Origin: Savages Genealogical Dictionary - Sarah Bagley born 3/2/1662 married John Mack who emigrated 1670. -- History of the Church p. 18 -- Hoyt's Old Families of Salisbury, Massachusetts - John Mack (could John Mack's birth date have been recorded incorrectly? The date traditionally given for John Mack's birth was actually the marriage date of his parent's-in-law.) --Ancestry and Posterity of Joseph Smith and Emma p.157 --Mack Genealogy p 17 (published 1879) --Sterling Genealogy p. 302 (published 1909) John Mack- Born Inveresk, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland and on to Connecticut. He had escaped about age 19. Perhaps he was the one that was tortured in Scotland and escaped into Ireland and came to America in the Anne and Hester Ship and landed in Boston, Massachusetts, April 1680. A copy of the Deposition of Francis Branson. From the following website: http://18thcenturyreadingroom.wordpress.com/2008/05/12/item-of-the-day-a-copy-of-the- deposition-of-francis-branson-1 680/ Found: Letters from the English Kings and Queens Charles II, James II, William and Mary, Anne, George II, &c. To the governors of the Colony of Connecticut, together with the Answers thereto, from 1635 to 1749; and Other Original, Ancient, Literary and Curious Documents, Compiled from Files and Records in the Office of the Secretary of the State of Connecticut. By R. R. Hinman, A. M. Secretary of the State of Connecticut. Hartford: John D. Eldredge, Printer, 1836. [pp. 119-120] Francis Branson, commander of the ship Anne and Hester, aged 30 years or thereabouts, in the behalf of his Majestie testifieth, that William Kelso, Chirurgeon [surgeon], and John Bowland, mate of the said ship, being aboard, in the grat cabbin at sea, the 16th day of April last, 1680, amongst other discourses that then passed between them, the said William Kelso in hearing of this Deponent, did declare in the great cabin, that he was the Chirurgeon General, in the late rebellion in Scotland, and that after the Duke of Monmouth had been there and qualified them, Kelso cut off his hair and wore a Perriwigg, and made his escape into the north of Ireland, and from thence transported himself to Dublin, and was there some small time, and from thence he made his escape to Bristol, and there he stayed a while, and after went up to London. He then at the same time did declare, that he knew those persons that murdered the Arch Bishop of St. Andrews, and that they had made their escape disguised, and could not be found; that there were six of them that sett upon him, when he was in his coach, going over a plain 3 miles from a village, that they hauled him out of his coach and told him that he had betrayed them, and therefore nothing should satisfy them but his blood. His Daughter being in the coach with him, opened her bosom, and desired them to spare her father and kill her, but they fell upon him with pistols, first pistolling him, and then hewed him in pieces with their swords; all which words were spoken by the said Kelso, when we were coming from England, being then bound for the Isle of May. Sworn to in Court, the 4th January, 1680, in Boston, New England. That this is a true copy taken and compared with the original, 4th January 1680. Attest, Edward Rawson, Secr'y. March 17 (441) Petition of Francis Branson to the King and Committee of Plantations. Petitioner was commander of a ship called the Anne and Hester, being bound for Boston in 1680, hired a Scotchman, William Kelso, for the voyage as chirurgeon, who upon the 16th April being then at sea bragged that he was surgeon-general in the late rebellion in Scotland and related the manner of his escape after the fight, and that he knew those who murdered the late archbishop of St. Andrews. By his discourse he seemed to be one of those bloody murderers. Petitioner said nothing to him at the time, intending to have him arrested on his return to England. After arrival at Boston Kelso kept constantly ashore for ten weeks, wholly neglecting his duty, and refused to come on board. The ship being ready to sail petitioner complained to the magistrates then sitting in court of his surgeon, and prayed their authority to order him on board. But Kelso had so insinuated himself with several of the magistrates and preachers by telling them that he was a Scotch gentleman and covenanter, and in particular with one Chickley, who calls himself the king's attorney, boasting to him that he had been of the late rebellion, that petitioner was ill- spoken to by some of the court and ordered to discharge Kelso, paying him his wages to that day. Seeing that he could not get back, England petitioner lodged an information against him on oath (copy annexed) in the said Court, but the Court took no notice of it but showed him great respect and kindness. Kelso was entertained by several of them at their houses. The Court ordered petitioner to pay Kelso 40 Pounds, and on his refusal caused him to be imprisoned, his ship arrested and the sails to be taken from her, valuing them at 171. 4s. Od. whereas they were worth 100 Pounds. They also discharged his seamen. Petitioner to release himself and redeem his sails was obliged to take up money on bottomry, and though he showed that he was obliged to pay Kelso's creditors 20 Pounds out of his wages on the return of his ship to England, yet the Court would not allow it. Thus petitioner was detained in Boston over six months and himself and his owners damnified to the amount of 1,000 Pounds. Prays redress. 1 p. Endorsed. Recd. 17 March 1681-82. Annexed, 441.1 Deposition of Francis Branson containing the allegations above recited against Kelso as to his share in the rebellion and in the murder of the archbishop of St. Andrews. Sworn at Boston, 4 Jan. 1680. 11/4 pp. Endorsed. Recd. 17 March 1682. [Co!. Papers, Vo!. XLVIII., Nos. 45, 45. I.] History of the Covenanters Page 163-165 In Lanarkshire the people were not less grievously oppressed. One of the most violent of the persecutors in that county was the provost of Rutherglen. This Episcopal champion despatched a party to the house of a poor widow, to apprehend her son for absenting himself from church; but the young man, aware of his fate, made a desperate effort, and escaped out of their hands. Disappointed of his prey, the provost ordered the sister to be apprehended, alleging that she was accessory to her brother's escape, fined her in thirty pounds, and threw her into prison. Nor was she permitted to visit her parent, whose grief had laid her on a sick-bed, though sufficient caution was offered by her friends. Nay, the pitiful persecutor again surprised the house of the widow at midnight, under pretence of searching for her son, and before leaving it, compelled her to give him twenty merks nearly all her living! (Crookshank, vol. ii. p. 131.) Wodrow, vol. iii. p. 385. From this anecdote, which is one of many of a similar kind, the reader is left to judge whether there be any truth in the assertion, that Claverhouse "would scorn to rob any private individual of a farthing!" So says a modern writer. But the inhumanity of the oppressors was not confined to deeds of extortion; they added the most revolting cruelty to avarice, and acted a part which would puzzle the most inveterate Tory writer to vindicate. In the parish of Kilbride, for example, Captain Inglis having seized three countrymen, who refused to swear the oath which he was pleased to dictate, deliberately tortured them by means of lighted matches bound between their fingers, till they were deprived of the use of their hands. Inglis then repaired to the house of a widow Mack, with the intention of apprehending her son ; but the young man having made his escape, the captain collected the whole inhabitants of the district, and tendered to each of them the following oath: " By the eternal God, and as I am content to lose my part in heaven, I know not where John Mack is." One individual refusing to swear so impious an oath, Inglis and his men beat him with their guns and swords, till they left him for dead! (Reverend Robert Wodrow, The History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland Vol. 3. p. 388.) One example more will be sufficient, and more than sufficient, to show the cruelty of the persecutors, and the truly wretched condition of the Presbyterians. Captain Inglis, in searching for a man who was accused of the dreadful crime of non-conformity, and who fortunately happened to be away from home, seized a boy in his employment of fifteen years of age, and commanded him to swear whether or not he knew where his master was to be found. This oath being refused by the boy, the brutal military struck him with their swords, and wounded him in several parts of the body. They then dragged him by the hair to the fire, and held his face so near that his eyes almost started from their sockets. After having again cut him with their swords, they left him for dead, bleeding in every part of his body. Contrary to expectation, he afterwards recovered ; but for several years he was bereft of reason, in consequence of the inhuman treatment which he had received. (Wodrow, vol. iii. p. 383.) As already noticed, all these barbarities were committed at the instance, and commonly under the eye of the curates. These reverend gentlemen regularly visited their parishioners, not to instruct or comfort, but to take down the names of those who absented themselves from church, who assembled together for prayer, or who kept family worship! All who acted so puritanically were noted down as disaffected Presbyterians, and reported to the military as fit objects to be reclaimed by torture or death. (Wodrow, vol. iii. pp. 386, 387.) But the heart sickens at the bare recital of such atrocities. Let the enemies of the Covenanters justify these persecutors as they may, their deeds will be held in everlasting execration by all who retain in their breasts the smallest spark of humanity. Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society ll Volume 8, pg 282 (Published 1916) No sources for this information are given in this Journal. "Lucy Mack, mother of Joseph Smith, was a direct descendant of John Mack, Scotch Covenanter, who came to New England to escape religious persecution and founded the noted Lyme, Connecticut, Mack family. Lucy Mack's father Solomon Mack, was born 1752, was a member of Israel Putnam's company in the French and Indian War, and afterwards served in the Revolution." "Brigham Young" by Morris Robert Werner (Published 1925) page 17 "Smith's ancestors were sturdy Scotch Covenanters, Puritans and Crusaders, of uncompromising principles, who helped to found colonies in this country and who fought in the colonial wars and the Revolutionary War. There are interesting details of the religious idiosyncrasies of ... " Mrs. Sophia (Smith) Martin asks: The name Mack in Lyme--who was the first? As to the ancestor of Josiah Mack, it has not yet been fully determined. Tradition says his father was Josiah, who came from Scotland, but a search has not yet verified it. Records have been found of a Josiah son of John named in will, also of brothers Orlando and Ebenezer-- and as tradition, also said he had brothers so named, it is strange that the will of John is found containing these brothers and no will of Josiah-- however, it does not change the record of descendants and I will proceed and in the meantime "hunt up," if possible, "the Josiah." A great grandson of Josiah sends me the following: "Col. Josiah Mack, 2d, built the house that David Mack tore down. It was occupied by the Col. and his father, Col. Josiah Mack, 1st, who came from Lyme to Hebron and lived near the Green, on land now, 1898, owned by Horace Porter, where his new barn stands, and lived there till the Porter, where his new barn stands, and lived there till he was an old man, then he and his wife came to Gilead, to live with his son Col. Josiah, the 2nd, and both died there and were buried in Gilead Cemetery. The first Col Josiah was at the storming of Quebec. The second Josiah was Col. in the Revolutionary War. The 2nd Col built first a log house, near Josiah Buell's, on the rear end of his farm, and later built on the front of his farm. It was 160 years when David Hall Mack tore it down and erected the new one, which is thirty-one years old at this time, 1898." The above I have quoted, but it does not appear to me to be correct, unless there is a Josiah previous to the one born in Lyme, Conn., in 1693. It is recorded that Josiah and Orlando, brothers, removed from Lyme to Hebron in Spring of 1720, sold the same and was given ten acres by his father-in-law in 1719. Rev. Samuel Peters (the Tory) in his "History of Hebron" (1822) mentions Josiah and Orlando Mack among the first settlers. David Barbe in his "Antiquities of Hebron" (1 795-1 800) says "Josiah and Orlander Mack," were from Lyme. In July, 1902, the records were searched and John Mack must be the ancestor of those in Lyme, Conn, and he so appears in this book--and Josiah is his son--thus making D. W. Patterson's assertion true, "Mrs. Martin makes a great mistake if she names Josiah as the first-- John Mack was the first in Lyme, Conn, and not Josiah -- I know it!" RESULT OF SEARCH, JULY, 1902- THE FIRST OF THE NAME IN LYME, CONNECTICUT D. William Patterson (recognized as authority especially for certain towns in Connecticut) wrote, "I know that Col. David Mack was descended from John Mack of Lyme. Do not forget that the first Mack of that place was John, not Josiah. Of John's (RIN 101912) children, Josiah married a Peterson (RIN 101949) and settled at Hebron, Conn., and he was grandfather of Col. David Mack." From Genealogical Register: "It is perfectly safe to say that we have had in America during the past forty years no genealogist whose work stands so absolutely unquestioned, or whose dicta in regard to any muted point was so unhesitatingly accepted as Dr. Patterson" -- David Williams Patterson, who died at his home, Newark Valley, New York, 18 Nov 1892. The compiler searched and searched to prove that Josiah was the first of the name in Lyme because of the faith she had (also her mother living with her and a granddaughter of Col. David Mack) in the account in the tract entitled "Col. David Mack, The Faithful Steward," and she thinks that tract is responsible for the error--for such it is, as proven by the will of John Mack, a copy of which is on Page 18 (herein). The tract states that Josiah Mack was great grandfather of Col. David Mack--and who is responsible for the error, who can tell! Mack Genealogy - The Descendants of John Mack of Lyme, Connecticut by Mrs. Sophia (Smith) Martin from Hartford, Conn. Rutland, Vermont/The Tuttle Company, Printers 1903. MACK GENEALOGY- THE DESCENDANTS OF JOHN MACK OF LYME, CONNECTICUT with Appendix: CONTAINING GENEALOGY OF ALLIED FAMILIES, ETC. BY MRS. SOPHIA (SMITH) MARTIN OF HARTFORD, CONN. Rutland, Vermont, The Tuttle Company, Printers 1903 pg. 18- Will of John Mack is said to have emigrated to America from Scotland in 1669, died 24 February 1721. He married 5 April 1681, in Boston, Sarah Bagley, who was born there March 2, 1663. She was daughter of Orlando and Sarah (Colby) Bagley. Orlando Bagley was a man of considerable influence in the district, a Constable ... The will of John Mack is dated 5 January 1721, proved 28 March 1721. The following are the clauses: 1st He bequests his soul to God. 2nd Names his wife, Sarah, she paying a certain sum to "daughter Marah" 3rd Names "eldest son, John" 4th Names two eldest daughters, "Sarah and Elizabeth" 5th Peter Person that married "my daughter Lydia" 6th Names "my son, Josiah" 7th "my son, Orlander" 8th "my daughter, Marah" 9th "my son, Jonathan" 10th "my son, Ebenezer" 11th My three youngest daughters to wit: "Joanna, Rebeckah and Deborah." He willed "Jonathan and Ebenezer the lands and "if either die before marriage the survivor has the other's part." There was also a clause that the land was never to be sold out of the family. He appointed his wife and son Ebenezer, Executors. His wife made oath to the inventory and it was accepted and recorded 12 April, 1721. John Mack and wife, Sarah, resided first at Salisbury, Mass., and there were twelve children: 2. John, b. 29 April, 1682 Salisbury, Mass. 3. Sarah, b. 1684 4. Elizabeth b. 1685 5. Lydia 6. Josiah, b. 1693, Lyme Conn. 7. Orlando, b. Lyme, Conn. 8. Ebenezer, 8 Dec 1697, Lyme Conn. 9. Marah, b. 10 Nov 1699, Lyme, Conn. 10. Rebecca, b. 4 Oct 1701, Lyme, Conn. 11. Joanna b 17 Sept 1703, Lyme, Conn. 12. Deborah, b. 11 Oct 1706, Lyme, Conn. 13. Jonathan b. About 1711, Lyme, Conn. (Beginning of Original Will in narrative herein:) In the name of God. Amen Know all Christian people that I, John Mack, Senser of the town of Lyme and county of New London, and Colony of Connecticut in New England, laboring under bodily infirmities but of perfect mind and memory not knowing how soon my great change may come do think it my duty to set my house in order before I die: and 1.Of all I give and bequeath my Soul to God that gave it to me and ye body to the dust from whence it was taken to be decently buried at the charge of my executor hereafter named. In hope of a Joyful Resurrection at the Last day with the Justified in Christ Jesus. 2.To my dear and loving wife Sarah I give and bequeath all my household goods and all my horse Kind and two cows and ten sheep and my saddle and bridle; to be at her own dispose forever she paying to my daughter, Marah twenty shillings and also be at twenty shillings charge in new covering the old house with one year after my decease. Also to my loving wife Sarah I, give and bequeath the use and improvement of that four acres of land in my son John his lot which I reserved in the deed of gift I gave him during his natural life: and the improvement of one end of my dwelling house to wit: the East end one room and lentow, and half the orchard, as long as she remains my widow; also one Great Bible during the time of her natural life, and I do also give to my wife Sarah my part of the crop of corn that is or shall be up on my lands. This present year or the year that I shall decease, also one of the best of my swine to be at her own dispose. 3.To my Eldest son, John I give and bequest five shillings and the reason I give him no more now is I judge that I have given him a full portion as my eldest son already. 4.To my two eldest daughters to wit. Sarah and Elizabeth I give and bequeath ten shillings apiece to be paid by my son Ebenezer within one year after my decease; which with what I have already given them will make up their part. To be paid by my son Ebenezer within one year after my decease. 5.To Peter Person that married my daughter Lydia I give and bequeath ten shillings to be paid by my son Ebenezer within three years after my decease, which ten shilling a piece I judge will make up their full portions with what they have already received. 6.To my son Josiah I give and bequeath six pounds in money or in creatures or mercantable provision at money price, only it is to be understood that he is to have my best coat for part of the above said six pound and what the said coat wants of the said six pounds is to be made up in special as afore said. 7.To my son Orlander I give and bequeth all the rest of my wearing apparill excepting my Great Coat and also my one gun and sword and what the clothing and arms wants of six pound shall be mde up with moveables or in money to make it up six pound. 8.To my daughter Marah I give the twenty shillings which I ordered my wife to pay her as was before expressed. 9.To my son Jonathan I give and bequeath a piece of land containing about two acres and half, more or less bounded as followeth by the highway easterly and by his one lands northerly and westerly, and southerly by the petition fence between this piece of land and the pastor, and to come towards the barn within three rods of the plow lands. Also one piece of land by estimation, four acres lying on the East side of my lot bounded or joining easterly by the twelve acres he bought of Mr. Richard Ely and northerly by Henery Bennits orchard, southerly by his brother Jon's land and westerly by the old fence and so to ye swamp which fence he is hereby injoined to keep in repair and maintain; also half an acre of land to build on at the north end of my home lot, he making a sufficient division fence between him and his brother Ebenezer and also maintain the same; these three pieces of land thus divided I do give to my son Jonathan and his heirs forever: it is to be understood that ye half acre of land before mentioned is at the northwest corner of my home Lott. I do upon Jonathan enjoined him to bring his mother two cords of fire wood yearly as long as she remains my widow. 10. To my son, Ebenezer, I give and bequeath my house and barn and orchard and all my lands in Lyme or elsewhere not already disposed of. I say to him, my son Ebenezer and his heirs forever: he providing for his mother eight cords of fire wood to her dwelling house yearly, and also to pay his mother forty shillings in corn or money yearly, both the aforesaid(?) wood and forty shilling aforesaid (?) to be paid yearly and every year as long as she remains my widow also to winter two cows and ten sheep and one horse, and to pasture, one horse and two cows at such times of the year as his mother shall desire the same, yearly as long as she remains my widow. 11.To my three youngest daughters to wit: Joanna, Rebekah, and Deborah, I give and bequeath six pound a piece to be paied as followeth to wit: Rebeckahs within one year after my decease, and Joana to be paied within three years after my decease, and Deborah to be paid within five years after my decease and if either of these three youngest daughters should die before they have received her ten, shall be equally divided between ye two youngest daughters besides the six pound before mentioned-- Also, my will is that is either Jonathan or Ebenezer should die before marriage then their lands to be possessed and inherited by my next youngest son--my meaning is that if Jonathan dies Ebenezer shall inherit his lands and if Ebenezer dieth, Jonathan shall inherit his lands: provided always that he that inherits the whole shall punctually fulfill what they were both obliged to do for their mother and after debts leases are payed the remainder of my moveable estate I give to my son Ebenezer and I do consent and appoint my loving wife Sarah and my son Ebenezer to be my Executors to this my last will and testament in confirm hereof, I have hereunto set my hand and afixed my seal this fifth day of January one thousand seven hundred and twenty or twenty-one. Signed, published in presents of us witness: John Comstock, Jasper Griffing, Samuell Marvin John Mack (Seal) Lyme Feb ye 13, 1720-21 this day John Mack acknowledged the above writen and on ye other his Last will and his act and Deed before me. Moses Noyes, Justice Peace. John Comstock, Jasper Griffin and Samuel Marvin within mentioned appeared before a Court of Probate held in New London April 4th, 1721, and made Oath that they saw John Mack Sign and Seal this Instrument and heard him declare the same to be his last Will and Testament and that he was then of a Sound and disposing mind and memory, according to the best of their knowledge and yet at the same time they set their hand thereunto as witnesses Test C. Christopher Clerk Recorded in the fourth Book of Wills for the County of New London, fol. 177, 178. April 11, 1721. Test C. Christopher Clerk. April 12, 1721. Amount recorded, inventory of estate 305 pounds - 13 shillings - 11 pence. (END of Will) Each child, in order named, with a record of all descendants to date 1902 + that have been obtained will now follow, so that each child of the emigrant and his or her descendants will be together arranged according to generations in each family. The foregoing will is the proof that John (and not Josiah as has for years been erroneously in print) was the ancestor in America of this branch of the Mack family. Nothing else has before convinced the compiler of this fact, for the family, one branch Josiah, had it recorded from what was supposed authority--that Josiah came from Scotland, and was the first ancestor, but as Josiah, born in Lyme, 1693, was son of John--as proven by the will-- one has to be convinced against one's will and not of the same opinion still. Ref: History of Surry, New Hampshire- Genealogical Register pg 757 - (Source for change to the Steve Lapp's Chart of Lauffen.) 1. John Mack b. Mar 6, 1653; d. Feb. 24, 1721; said to have emigrated from Scotland 1669; m. in Boston, Mass., Apr. 5, 1681 Sarah Bagley. 2. Ebenezer Mack b. Lyme, Conn., Dec. 8, 1697; d. about 1777; "dropped dead" while bringing in a "back log." He md. Apr 30, 1728 Hannah Huntley, daughter. of Aaron Huntley of Lyme. They had nine children 3. Solomon Mack b. Lyme Sept. 15, 1732; d. Aug. 23, 1820; an early settler at Gilsum; served in Rev. war; m. Jan. 4, 1759 Lydia Gates who d. Tunbridge, Vt. 4. Solomon Mack (Solomon, Ebenezer, John) b. Jan. 28, 1773; d. Oct. 12, 1851. He lived in S. 1794 6; m. (1) in S. Aug. 29, 1797 Esther Hayward who d. Apr. 13, 1844, daughter. of Nathan Hayward, q. v. He m. (3) June 4, 1845 Mrs. Batsey (Way) Alexander who d. Swanzey Oct. 5, 1863. He was Capt. in Militia; selectman in Gilsum and a strong temperance man. Ch by (1) wife: i. Calvin b. 5 Nov. 28, 1797; d. Aug. 13, 1845 Butler, Ill. ii. Orlando Sept. 23, 1799; d. Butler, Ill., Aug 4, 1879; m. three times; had six children by (1) w.; and three by last w. iii. Chilion July 26, 1802. First Postmaster at Gilsum. (6) iv. Solomon May 23, 1805; m. Sept. 22, 1829 Adaline Wilder Knight of Marlow; had eight children. He was Capt of the militia v. Amos May 1, 1807; d. Oct. 17, 1824. vi. Dennis Oct 18, 1809; d. Aug 4, 1811. History of Surry - *The Family of Mack name is more numerous in the very early history of Gilsum (over half of Surry formerly was included in Gilsum township) than any other one family. Jonathan, Jonathan, Jr., John, Joseph, and Abner Mack were among those who drew the lots -- they were among the original proprietors. The Making of Mormon Cosmology, 1644-1844. Settling in the broader orbit of the Rogerenes, the Macks would carry ... The Founder of the family, John Mack arrived in New England in 1669 at the age of sixteen, hailing from the Scottish town of Inverness. Again, like Robert Smith, we must assume that John Mack served an indenture or an apprenticeship. Radical Origins by John L. Brooke, American Council of Learned Societies M270.2 A 549r Special Collections BYU and Church History Library 1130 HBLL/BX8630.1 B79r 1994. Extract- pp. 46-87 Rogerenes University of Utah Library - Special BX8643.C68 B76 1994 General BX8643.C68B76 A PREPARED PEOPLE - Pg 10 Between the extremes of the magisterial Calvinism of the New England Puritans and the hermetic perfection of the German sectarians at Ephrata lay an important middle ground, literally a conduit between New England and the Mid-Atlantic. The sectarian peoples of southeastern New England, curiously neglected in recent historiography, played an important role in the transferal of the Radical Reformation to the New World. They are absolutely critical to our understanding of the hermetic inheritance of nineteenth-century Mormonism. With their own connections running back to the radical experience of the English Revolution, the New England sectarians were receptive to the systematic hermetic perfection of the German sectarians; certainly they were themselves the reservoir of a great proportion of the fragments of occult belief and practice floating around seventeenth-and eighteenth-century New England. Among their number, as we shall see, were ancestors of both Joseph Smith and Brigham Young, as well as quite a number of other Mormon forebears. The first bearers of the Radical Reformation of New England advanced both extreme restorationism and paradisial universalism - making them both extreme restorationism and paradisial universalium -- making them both important antecedents of the Mormon theology and anathema to the Puritan state at Massachusets Bay. Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson and Samuel Gorton all challenged magistrial orthodoxy in the early decades, and all would be exiled to the wilds of the Narragansett region, where the religious pluralism of Rhode Island and the Providence Plantation would be a beacon to radical sectarians throughout the Atlantic world. Between his arrival in 1631 and the early 1640s, Roger Williams moved from an extreme biblical primitivism to the full-blown spirtualist Seekerism of a Caspar Schwenkfeld or a William Erbury. Wiliams rejected the common English Puritan typology of an Old Testament Israel. The Christian dispensation had superseded that of Israel, severing the civil and the religious spheres. Rejecting the slightest hint of compromise with a corrupt English church and state, Williams refused to join the Boston church unless the members rejected their former communion in English parishes; in Salem in 1633 he urged as apostolic imitation that women be veiled in church, and then he assailed the charter itself, arguing that the acceptance of the land patent from the king was itself corrupt. Established on his own patent at Providence Plantations, William's ideas crystallized in a way that would differentiate him not only from Puritan orthodoxy but also from later Quaker spiritualism, and in a way that would anticipate the restorationism of Joseph Smith two centuries later. Rejecting Catholic tradition and the Anglican reformation as apostasy, Williams argued that there had been no true Christian church since Christianity had first been established as a state religion under Constantine. Rather than a Congregational convenant or Baptist rebaptizing, the authority for ministry and ordinances in a Christian church could only come from divine revelation. This would be a third dispensation: "There is a Time of purity and Primitive Sincerity, there in a time of Transgression and Apostacy, there is a time of the coming of the Babilonian Apostacy and Wilderness." This would be an age of spirit; in this "restauration of Zion . . . it may please the Lord againe to . . . powre forth those fiery streames againe of Tongues and Prophecie." William's Seekerism clearly anticipated Mormon dispensationalism (footnote 48) Williams's challenge to Massachusetts was followed by that of Anne Hutchinson, who settled with her husband in Boston in 1634 and soon built a following behind her radical message that only the infusion of divine grace was sufficient for salvation; works were not only meaningless but infringed on the power of an all-determining Calvinist God. Accused of heresy, Hutchinson's final mistake was to claim to know "by an immediate revelation" through "the voice of (God's) own spirit to my soul" that the Massachusetts ministers lay under a covenant of works rather than grace. (footnote 49) Banished to Rhode Island, Hutchinson was welcomed by Roger Williams. By 1642 she had moved on to Seeker doctrines: John Winthrop wrote that she and her following not only "denied all magistracy" but "Maintained that there were no churches since those founded by the apostles" and that there could be none until the Second Coming. (footnote 50) A year later she was dead, killed by Indians at Pelham Bay on Long Island If Anne Hutchinson's radicalism was thus truncated, that of Samuel Gorton evolved into New England's most direct connection to the spiritual mysticism of the English Revolution. As with Anne Hutchinson, there is no clear story of his early formative influences in England, though he -- Lawrence Clarkson and Gerald Winstanly -- came from Lancashire. Gorton's theology was strikingly similar to the paradisial universalism of the Familists and earlier Continental mystics. Advancing, like Williams, a Christ-centred theology, Gorton argued that "Christ was incarnate when Adam was made after God's image." As Adam's seed, all humanity were heirs to divine perfection; there was, Gorton argued, an "equal nearness of the divine spirit to both the sinner and the saint." Such a circumstance destroyed all need for church ordinances. His near- pantheist universalism was more radically expressed in his injunction to "goe and preach the Gospel in every creature." This divinization put Gorton and his followers into a new dispensation and beyond sin: one Gortonist claimed in 1640 to have been "free from Original sin and from actual also for a year and a half." Holding themselves outside the confines of human law, the Gortonists were accused of advocating spiritual wifery and a community of goods; certainly they closely paralleled the English Diggers and the Ranters. (footnote 51) Arrested by Massachusetts authorities in 1643, Gorton returned to London in 1644, mingling with English radicals until moving on to Rhode Island in 1648, where he led a small and declining group of followers till his death in 1677 (footnote 52) These individual radicals would be followed by more organized (pg 47) sectarians in the decades to come. Quaker missionaries, welcomed to Rhode Island, carried their gospel into Massachusetts in 1656, to face death for their convictions before a few meetings took hold in Boston and in towns to the north. Baptist dissenters emerging in the 1640s formed a church in Boston in 1663 and a scattered presence in the Merrimack Valley. (footnote 53) Despite the drama of Baptist and Quaker efforts in the old Massachusetts Bay counties, the real core of New England dissent centred in Rhode Island and stretched east and west along the coast of southeastern New England. Baptists were established by the early 1 640s in Newport and Providence, sending off sister churches and dividing into General Baptists (noted for their Arminian and universalist theology), Particular Baptists (ardent Calvinists), and Seventh- Day Baptists (advocates of strict Old Testament Sabbatarianism, which they shared with the German Brethren. One has to wonder who else was moving along the sea routes linking London, the West Indies, and Rhode Island in the 1660s. Barbados and Jamaica were noted for religious toleration, and they were the refuge and dumping ground for sectarians escaping or transported from Restoration England, among them Familists, Ranters, and possibly Levelers and Digraid on Panama, and transported soldiers, among them Fifth Monarchists and Muggletonians, were raising trouble in the Chesapeake. (Footnote 57) Quaker missionaries encountered perfectionist Ranters, later manifested as "Young Quakers," "New Quakers," or "Singing Quakers," around Oyster Bay on Long Island and in Rhode Island in 1672, and into the next decade they were to be found as far afield as Plymouth Colony and the Chesapeake. Presumably these were locals, not immigrants, yet there may well have been a West Indian leaven among them. (Footnote 58) Such radical connections had lasting results in Connecticut, where the Rogerenes were simultaneously the last of the English revolutionary sects and the first of the indigenous American perfectionists sects, in a line that would run a quite directly to the Mormons. Having joined the Newport Seventh-Day Baptist Church in 1674, a group from New London, Connecticut, led by John Rogers, withdrew in 1677. As one historian has put it, the Rogerenes were both "influenced by sectarian ideas emanating from England" and "the first indigenous American sects,"(footnote 59) They were remarkably durable, cohering as sectarian communities in New London and nearby Groton into the nineteenth century, with outlying families scattered through the region and down into New Jersey. In a pantheism echoing Winstanley and the Ranters, the Rogerenes saw all days as equally holy and rejected any concept of a sacred Sabbath, incurring the wrath of the law for working on Sundays as well as disrupt orthodox services. Regarding themselves a form of Quakers, they adopted a pacifist doctrine and rejected both hired ministers and any oaths as unscriptural, as well as vocal prayer unless it was inspired by direct revelation. In 1678 John Rogers began practicing faith healing, praying over the sick and anointing them with oil. He died in 1721 tending the sick during a small pox epidemic in Boston. (Footnote 60) ROGERENE doctrine had very close affinities with radical beliefs in circulation since the Reformation. John Rogers announced a universal salvation based upon Christ's atonement: the sentence for Adam's transgression in the garden "extended no farther than the first death" of the body. Adam in the garden had eaten of the tree of knowledge, but Christ was a second Adam, giving "access to the tree of life." the second Adam brought not only "free pardon" for all sins, but perfection: "the sinner is enabled (to) live in the perfect obedience of that light or knowledge of good and evil." according to Peter Pratt, a one-time Rogerene, Rogers preached that the "gradual work" of motification of lusts "lands a man in a state of perfection" from which he "cannot fall." in language that paralleled Muggletonian thought, Rogers also preached a doctrine of the two seeds of Adam, "two nations, and two manners of people," descended from Cain and Abel, and linked respectively with the tree of knowledge and the tree of life. this doctrine of the two seed was a central theme in English Muggletonian thought, and it would reappear, I shall suggest, in the form of Lamanites and Nephites in Joseph Smith's Book of Mormon over a century later. (Footnote 61) ... This language anticipated that of the Book of Mormon, just as the Smiths' exposure to white magic and metallurgy in seventeenth and eighteenth century Topsfield anticipated Joseph Smith's behavior and belief in the burned-over district in the 1820. In Essex County ? the experience of Joseph Smith's mother's family, the Macks. Settling in the broader orbit of the Rogerenes, the Macks would carry their religious belief into the spiritual realms of visions, healings, and the quest for a new dispensation well before Joseph Smith Sr. married Lucy Mack in Tunbridge, Vermont, in 1796.... In 1681 John Mack married Sarah Bagley in Salisbury, Massachusetts, just south of Hampton, New Hampshire, where Stephen Batchelor had established his Husbandmen, and where Quaker sentiments voiced in the 1 660s anticipated the forming of a Monthly Meeting by 1705 (footnote 64). In 1692 John Mack married Sarah Bagley in Salisbury, Massachusetts, just south of Hampton, New Hampshire, where Stephen Batchelor had established his Husbandmen, and where Quaker sentiments voiced in the 1660s anticipated the forming of a Monthly Meeting by 1705 (footnote #64) In 1692 his father-in-law, Orlando Bagley, was deputized as constable to arrest Susannah Martin on witchcraft charges, but John Mack had moved his family to Concord by 1684, and in 1696 moved on to Lyme, Connecticut. (Footnote 65) When they arrived in Lyme the Mack family included six children, the eldest about thirteen, and six more would arrive by 1706. Lyme was a place where the older proprietary families held the advantage, and prospects were bleak for most newcomers. (Footnote 66) The town was still thinly settled, but the land was very stony and hilly, and the Macks arrived too late to gain a proprietorship. John Mack was granted an inhabitancy in July 1702, six week after the distribution of lots in the last division of Lyme's common lands. (Footnote 67) Mack died at sixty-eight in 1721, and his sons did not fare well in the decades following. The eldest, John Jr., thirty-nine at his father's death, moved away from farming into the retail trade, selling dry goods brought in from Boston. Taken ill quite suddenly, he died in 1734. His younger brother Ebenezer had inherited the family farm and had - in the memory of his son Solomon - a "large property and lived in good style" until he suffered a sudden financial disaster in the late 1730s. Though he did not die until 1777, Ebenezer Mack's family was dispersed among neighboring households, including four-year-old Solomon Mack, the maternal grandfather of Joseph Smith, the Mormon prophet. Solomon's cousin Ebenezer Mack (son of John Jr.), who would become the (Ana-Baptist or Brethren minister in East Lyme), chose a rich landowner in North Lyme, Samuel Selden, as his own guardian, and it is possible that Solomon too worked in this household until he enlisted in the provincial forces in 1755 to take part in the fighting on Lake Champlain. Over the next several years Solomon Mack alternated between service with the army and farming in Lyme. In 1759 he married Lydia Gates of the Millington District of East Haddam, and in 1762 they joined the streams of migrants moving up the Connecticut River to settle first in Marlow and then in Gilsum, New Hampshire, where they would live among people from Lyme and people who would figure in the later story of the emergence of Mormonism. (Footnote 68) These, then, are the outlines of the Mack family experience in Lyme. It is possible that John Mack, apparently of dissenting inclination, with no necessary commitment to the brand of Puritan orthodoxy in Massachusetts Bay, was attracted to Lyme because of the unorthodox reputation of its religious culture. If late immigrants were less likely to have had Puritan motivations, Lyme and its mother town of Saybrook would have been especially attractive. Saybrook was founded in 1635 by John Winthrop Jr. without the Puritan requirement of a settled minister or an established church, which was not organized until 1646. Lyme was even more aberrant. Settled in 1666 and set off from Saybrook in 1670, Lyme had regular preaching by Moses Noyes but no incorporated church until 1693, a circumstance that, as one historian has put it, "may have been unique" in seventeenth-century Connecticut. (Footnote 69) As we have seen, Saybrook and Lyme constituted the western flank of a region stretching from the lower Connecticut River to Cape Cod where sectarian dissent challenged and often supplanted Puritan orthodoxy. In southeast Connecticut itself, sectarianism began in the 1 670s, with the rise of the Seventh-Day Baptists in New London the secession of Rogerenes, and the itinerancies of the Singing Quakers. By the 1720s Sixth Principle Baptist churches had been formed in Groton and New London with a spreading from their center at New London into Groton, East Lyme, Saybrook, Colchester, and Lebanon. (Footnote 70) The Great Awakening would bring even greater religious complexity to southeast Connecticut, with Separate churches hiving off from the establishment and Ana-Baptist meetings emerging from these, all in an environment intensified by James Davenport's violent revivalism in New London. (Footnote 71) And scattered through the region there were reminders of a radical religious tradition stretching back into the Reformation and the English Revolution. The New London Rogers family was descended from the martyr John Rogers, burned at the stake in 1560; the martyr's Bible was said to have been carried like a talisman to America, and passed down through Roger's kin among the Westerly, Rhode Island, Sabbatarians. Valentine Wightman, who ministered to the Groton Sixth Principle Baptist while remaining on good terms with the Rogerenes, was descended from Edward Wightman, who went to his execution in 1612 in full expectation of the coming of the prophet Elias and a new dispensation. In New London, the Sixth Principle Baptists were led by Stephen Gorton, descended from Samuel Gorton of Warwick and a son-in- law of James Rogers of New London. (Footnote 72) The 1740s saw the visit of the Ephrata pilgrims and here were other strands of hermetic culture here as well. John Brewster, the trader at New London in the 1650s, corresponded with John Winthrop Jr. on his efforts to distill the "red elixir," and legends survived far into the eighteenth century about Winthrop himself. As late as 1787 Ezra Stiles recorded such a story about a mountain in East Haddam, "the Place to which Gov. Winthrop . . . used to resort with his Servant; and after spending three Weeks in the Woods of this Mountain in roasting ores & assaying Metals & casting gold rings, he used to return home to New London with plenty of Gold." (Footnote 73) And in 1797 one Isaac Walden was reported to have sponsored the republication of Muggletonian founder John Reeves's a Transcendent Spiritual Treatise. Walden, a contemporary of Solomon Mack, had joined the Rogerenes after harrowing experiences in the Canadian campaigns of the early 1 760s; in 1797 he was described as a basket maker and devout Muggletonian, living on Carter's Island north of New London. (Footnote 74) It was this regional culture, pervasively colored by sectarian controversy, highlighted by (Ana Baptists called) Rogerene spiritism and Davenport's enthusiasm, in which the Mack family lived for six decades before joining the migration up the Connecticut River to New Hampshire. John Mack Sr. expressed his own hostility to the Congregational "standing order" in twice refusing to serve as a collector of the established minister's rate. (Footnote 75) The Macks were not immune to economic aspiration, as suggested by John Mack, Jr.'s venture in trade and manifested in Solomon Mack's lifelong neglect of religion as he tried "to lay up treasures in this world." (Footnote 76) But when Solomon was converted in 1811, it was in a family tradition of visionary experience, a tradition nurtured in the sectarian environment of southeast Connecticut. On February 13, 1721, John Mack Sr. scrawled his signature on his last will and testament, distributing his worldly goods and, in the manner of English dissenters, announcing that he died "in hope of a joyful resurrection at the last day (illegible) justified in Christ Jesus." ((Footnote 77- Will of John Mack, Feb 13, 1721, Colchester Probate District Records, docket no. 3349. On pious clauses, see Margaret Spufford, Contrasting Communities: English Villagers in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (New York, 1974), 320-344.)) Three weeks before, John Mack Jr. had signed another document, the petition of eighteen inhabitants that a separate parish be set off in north Lyme. One of the men witnessing his father's will, Jasper Griffing, also signed the parish ... men witnessing his father's will, Jasper Griffing, also signed the parish petition. In 1724 the north Lyme petition was granted, and then the Macks and the Griffings and their neighbors had to content with efforts to make another division, to encompass sections of Lyme and East Haddam along the Connecticut River, finally granted in 1742. (Footnote 78) North Lyme was the Third Parish in Lyme and followed the establishment of a Second Parish in east Lyme by only a few years; Had Lyme Parish made a fourth division, and a fifth was created in 1764 from parts of east and north Lyme and New London. (Footnote 79) Never a place deeply committed to the Puritan church tradition, religious unity in Lyme was breaking down in the 1720s, as people living on the edges of the town attempted to balance their interest in local worship with the costs of taxation, a contest that had men walking the roads with surveying chains. As were the Macks, the Griffings were from Non-English origins, and these two families would maintain their alliance in the religious contests that wracked Lyme over the next decades. Jasper Griffing's father had arrived in New England from Wales in 1670 had made his way (like John Mack Sr.) through Essex County, to Long Island, and eventually to Lyme, where he too was admitted to the privileges of inhabitancy just after Lyme's final land division. (Footnote 80) In 1743, the year that James Davenport gathered the New London Separates and his New Light school, the "Shepherd's Tent," on a wharf in the Thames River to burn the texts and symbols of Puritan orthodoxy, Griffings and one of the Macks signed a petition for a Separate Society in North Lyme. (footnote 81) Macks and Griffings were also among the signers of Solomon Paine's 1748 petition to the General Assembly, signed by 332 "Separates or Independents." (footnote 82) Separate meetings formed in each of Lyme's three older parishes. The north Lyme Separates, led by Daniel Miner, formed the Grassy Hill Church, the Separates in the First Parish followed John Fuller, and the east Lyme Separates followed Ebenezer Mack, son of John Jr. and Solomon's first cousin. By the 1760s, in Ezra Stile's estimate, roughly a third of the town attended these dissenting meetings, with the greater adherence in the east and the north Lyme parishes. These churches would be inclusive in their membership, accepting both "sprinkled" Separates and those advocating adult immersion in "Catholic Communion." Ebenezer Mack's church adopted open communion in 1752; by the late 1760s Mack, ordained as a Separate in 1749, could no longer "build and commune" with those who would not accept the closed- communion form being advanced by Isaac Backus. Resigning from the church, he joined the flow of migration to the north, joining his younger cousin Solomon Mack in Marlow, New Hampshire. (footnote 83) During the years of revival and church building, Solomon Mack was growing up on the farm of a master who, he wrote in 1811, never spoke "at all on the subject of religion." Solomon emerged from his service "totally ignorant of divine revelation or anything appertaining to Christian religion." (footnote 84) His experiences over the next half-decade were equally unsuited for religious training. From this godless house Solomon entered the army in September 1755, serving for eight and a half months. Buying a farm in Lyme and two teams of oxen, he carried supplies for the army until 1758, when he set up a sutler's shop at Crown Point. (footnote 85) Apparently the dramas of the Great Awakening and its immediate aftermath passed him by, though later in life his family would be settled among people whose religious sentiments were shaped in great part by Ebenezer Mack's (Ana) Baptist church. However, Solomon Mack's children, among them Joseph Smith's mother, Lucy, would be most influenced by their mother, Lydia Gates. Solomon Mack married Lydia Gates of East Haddam in January 1759, presumably on a brief visit from Crown Point. Laying to the north of Lyme on the eastern shore of the Connecticut River, East Haddam had been settled in 1670 as an extension of the town of Haddam, and the Gates family had been a leading family since settlement. Arriving in Hartford in 1751 as a young man, Captain George Gates had been one of the earliest settlers east of the river in the 1670s and one of the founding members of the East Haddam church in 1704. His grandson Daniel Gates, Lydia's father played a similar leading role in Millington Parish, formed in 1733 in the southeast corner of the town. A tanner and "a man of wealth," Daniel Gates served as selectman and deacon of the Millington church. (footnote 86) Lydia's mother was Lydia Fuller, from a family settling in East Haddam from Barnstable on Cape Cod in the 1690s who were greatly intermarried with the Gates. (footnote 87) Compared with the religious contentions in Lyme, the Millington church was rather quiet. Apparently the church was New Light (Ana-Baptist) in tendency, for when its minister, Timothy Symmes, wandered off in 1740 as a radical New Light itinerant the Millington people waited three years before dismissing him. For several decades before the Revolution, however, the church was divided by a controversy involving a group known as the "Ole Fathers and Dissenters of New England," a group of Anglican lay readers led by the family of Jonathan Beebe, originally of New London, who in 1704 was the first to settle in the Millington District. (footnote 88) Judging by church membership, the Fuller and Gates families were not swept by religious fervor. Other than Deacon Daniel Gates, no other Gates or related Fuller appears to have joined the church in the decades between or related Fuller appears to have joined the church in the decades between the Awakening and July 1872, when Lydia Gates Mack was received into communion before departing for Marlow. (footnote 89) But here the lack of church membership In these families may not have meant a lack of piety. In Richard Bushman's assessment, Lydia Gates Mack "imparted faith to her children, but she did not give them a church." Growing up on the New Hampshire frontier and then after 1777 for some years in Montague, Massachusetts, the children's religious sensibilities were shaped by the family prayers conducted by Lydia. Lucy Mack Smith's detailed autobiography does not mention a church in relation to the family until 1791. (footnote 90) Rather than church centered, the children's religious experience was intensely familial and individual. Jason Mack, Lucy's oldest brother and an uncle of Joseph Smith Jr., by the age of sixteen "became what was then called a Seeker." Harking back to the perfectionists of the Awakening, the Seekers of the English Revolution, Roger Williams in the Rhode Island wilderness, and hermetic radicals of the Continental Reformation, Jason believed "that by prayer and faith the gifts of the Gospel, that were enjoyed by the ancient disciples of Christ, might be attained, (and) he labored almost incessantly to convert others to the same faith." By the end of the Revolution, at the age of twenty, Jason was a lay preacher; after 1800 he led a communal society in the New Brunswick interior. In 1835 Jason wrote to his brother that for over a decade he had "seen the greatest manifestations of the power of God in healing the sick." (footnote 91) Jason's sister Lovisa also claimed to have experienced such powers. Around 1791, after two years of incapacitating illness, Lovisa surprised his sister Lovina in announcing that "the Lord has healed me, both soul and body." Rising from her sickbed, Lovisa described her healing vision to a meeting in the local church a few days later: I seemed to be born away to the world spirits, where I saw the Saviour, as through a veil, which appeared to me about as thick as a spider's web, and he told me that I must return again to warn the people to prepare for death . . . and that if I would do this, my life should be prolonged. (footnote 92) Twenty years later visions had become a family tradition. Solomon Mack was converted to religious faith in 1811 after days of anxiety were followed by the experience of flashes of light "as bright as fire" and a voice in the night called his name And over the previous decade, first Lucy Mack and then her husband, Joseph Smith Sr., had a series of dreams and visions that anticipated those that their son Joseph would experience at Palmyra, New York, in the 1 800s (footnote 93) pg 78 of Refiner's Fire ... To complete this tour of the interpenetration of the visible and invisible worlds among the most important proto-Mormon families, we need to turn to the experience of Joseph's Smith's mother, the Macks. Settling in the broader orbit of the Rogerenes, the Macks would carry their religious beliefs into the spiritual realms of visions, healings, and the quest for a new dispensation well before Joseph Smith Sr. married Lucy Mack in Tunbridge, Vermont in 1796. If the sectarian environment of coastal Connecticut had shaped this visionary familial spiritualism, we can also trace a number of paths by which Rogerene influences in particular might have reached these families. The north Lyme parish petitioners and Separates included a nephew of John Rogers, the founding Rogerene, and two cousins of a Rogerene outliver in neighboring Colchester. Solomon Mack's brother Elisha married into one of these Rogerene- connected families. In East Lyme, a branch of Valentine Wightman's sixth Principle Baptist Church was disrupted by Rogerene beliefs in the 1 730s, and such sentiments might well have lingered among the people attending Ebenezer Mack's open-communion Baptist church. In 1733 Ebenezer, grandson of John Mack Jr. (herein), married a widow, Abigail Fox Davis, the niece of Rogerenes, Samuel and Bathsheba Fox. Thus the Macks themselves had several direct connections to Rogerene's "perfectionism". (footnote 94) It is entirely possible, of course, that these Lyme families may have had profoundly hostile opinions of the Rogerenes, as we may assume that the Goddards and Youngs had toward the Hopkinton Immortalists. In East Haddam, the closest link to the Rogerenes was among the Beebes, but Jonathan Beebe (whose brothers Samuel and William were a Rogerene and a Sabbatarian) clearly distanced himself from the Rogerene stronghold in New London by settling in Millington in 1704. (footnote 95) This family's subsequent Anglicanism suggests a continuing antipathy to perfectionism, though this stance had its sectarian undertones. Two ministerial families in Lyme would have had bitter memories of John Rogers. John Rogers, like other perfectionists, had a complex marital history. In 1670, four years before he began to doubt Congregationalism, he had married Elizabeth Griswold of Lyme. When Rogers withdrew from the New London church and was baptized by the Seventh-Day Baptists, Elizabeth was convinced by her family to leave him, and through their powerful connections the Griswolds, obtained a divorce without his consent. After twenty-five years of celibacy, Rogers took up with his servant girl, Mary Ransford, and announced their marriage in county court, but he rejected the authority of civil government over his marital relations because it had taken his first wife from him against his will. After she bore him two children in a common-law marriage, Rogers sent Mary to Block Island in 1710, apparently because of continuing civil harassment, and in 1714 was married by a Rhode Island magistrate to a third wife, Sarah Cole, a Singing Quaker from Long Island.(footnote 96) These particulars of Rogers's life were detailed in 1725 in a tract titled The Prey Taken by the Strong, written by Peter Pratt of Lyme, the son of Elizabeth Griswold Rogers by her second marriage. When Pratt's father died in 1688, Elizabeth married Matthew Beckwith. Thus, by virtue of her birth and various marriages, Elizabeth was the aunt of the Reverend George Griswold, the orthodox minister in the east Lyme parish, who married Solomon Mack's parents in 1728, and she was the step grandmother of the Reverend George Beckwith, the orthodox minister in the north parish, who witnessed John Mack Jr.'s will in 1734. She was also related to another of Beckwiths, noted Baptist preachers, who were affiliated with Ebenezer Mack's church in East Lyme and who emigrated to Marlow, New Hampshire, in the 1760s. (footnote 97) Without more direct testimony, these connections are difficult to assess. What does seem clear, however, is that -- like the Goddards and Youngs in Framingham - the Macks, the Gates, and the Fullers lived in a social environment where a sect of perfectionists would have been a topic of heated conversation. Even if they were alarmed by Rogerene doctrine and practice, they would have known something of it, and we may venture that a certain fascination followed on that alarm. An imperfect knowledge of perfectionist doctrine was more than no knowledge at all, and Peter Pratt's distribe against the Rogerenes included a rather clear accounting of their belief. Suffice it to say that there are striking affinities of religious style between Rogerene spiritism and the Seekerism, faith healing, and visions that the Mack family contributed to the Mormon emergence. We can only speculate on the roots of the visionary tradition among the families of Lydia Gates and Solomon Mack, but we are on firmer ground when we look more broadly at eighteenth-century Lyme and East Haddam as a hearth of nineteenth-century radical perfectionism. Elias Smith, one of the founders of the Christian movement, was born in East Lyme in 1769, where his father, Stephen Smith, had signed a 1766 Baptist petition with Ebenezer Mack. ? Mack's Baptist church produced at least one Mormon family, the Gees, intermarried with the Macks and with members of this church. Beyond the Mack connection, the towns of southeast Connecticut produced a number of Mormon converts: Beebes and Culvers from New London and Groton, the Pratts of Saybrook, and Orson Spencer, whose family moved from East Haddam to West Stockbridge, Massachusetts, where they were Baptists when he joined the Mormons in 1839. (footnote 99) The maternal (Mack) family of the prophet Joseph Smith was part of a broader stream linking the sectarian world of southeast Connecticut to nineteenth-century Mormonism." ---------------------------- Genealogical Register pg 757 Surrey, New Hampshire History The family of Mack name is more numerous in the very early history of Gilsum (over half of Surrey formerly was included in Gilsum township) than say other one family. Jonathan, Jonathan, Jr., John, Joseph and Abner Mack were among those who drew the lots--they were among the original proprietors. Other References - Directory of Ancestral Heads of New England Families by Frank R. Holmes; Genealogical Records of the Descendants of David Mack by Sophia Martin; Some descendants of Orlando Bagley by Martha Bagley; Ancestry and Posterity of Joseph Smith and Emma Hale by Mary Anderson; History of Gilsum, New Hampshire by Hayward; Mack Genealogy. The Descendants of John Mack of Lyme, Conn. by Mrs. Sophia (Smith) Martin, Hartford, Conn. (Will 1721 pg. 18) History of the Town of (Gilsum Co. and Surry) Cheshire Co., New Hampshire pg. 757 Sterling Genealogy by Albert Mark Sterling 6th great grandson of John Mack; The Mack Family Association of America. Emigrated to Boston, Mass 1669-1680 (after 1660 return of monarchy and Episcopal Church). Reformer from Clergymen d. in Lyme, CT. md 5 April 1681 Sarah Bagley in Salisbury, MA. (Will in 1721). (Bagley Family was from the British Isles.) Found: Letters from the English Kings and Queens Charles II, James II, William and Mary, Anne, George II, &c. To the governors of the Colony of Connecticut, together with the Answers thereto, from 1635 to 1749; and Other Original, Ancient, Literary and Curious Documents, Compiled from Files and Records in the Office of the Secretary of the State of Connecticut. By R. R. Hinman, A. M. Secretary of the State of Connecticut. Hartford: John D. Eldredge, Printer, 1836. [pp. 119-120] Francis Branso

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