JosephSmithSr.
So shall it be with my father: he shall be
called a prince over his posterity, holding
the keys of the patriarchal priesthood over the kingdom of God on earth, even the Church
of the Latter Day Saints, and he shall sit in the general assembly of patriarchs, even in
council with the Ancient of Days when he shall sit and all the patriarchs with him and shall
enjoy his right and authority under the direction of the Ancient of Days.
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MACK, Elder Ebenezer

MACK, Elder Ebenezer

Male 1697 - 1792  (94 years)  Submit Photo / DocumentSubmit Photo / Document

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  • Name MACK, Ebenezer 
    Prefix Elder 
    Born 8 Dec 1697  Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 8 May 1792  Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried 10 May 1792  Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    WAC 25 Nov 1909  SLAKE Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    _TAG Reviewed on FS 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I19671  Joseph Smith Sr and Lucy Mack Smith | Joseph Sr., Lucy Mack
    Last Modified 23 Dec 2019 

    Father MACK, John Jr.   Additional Information on MACK, John Jr. - I19686,   b. 6 Mar 1653, Inveresk, Midlothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Feb 1721, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Mother BAGLEY, Sarah ,   b. 2 Mar 1663, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 4 May 1733, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 70 years) 
    Married 5 Apr 1681  Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    Notes 
    • ~SEALING_SPOUSE: Also shown as SealSp 25 May 1985, PROVO.
    Family ID F7989  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family HUNTLEY, Hannah   Additional Information on HUNTLEY, Hannah - I19672,   b. 22 Jul 1708, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Mar 1807, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 98 years) 
    Married 20 Apr 1728  Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • MARRIAGE: Also shown as Married 30 Apr 1728 ~SEALING_SPOUSE: Also shown as SealSp 4 Dec 1956
    Children 
     1. MACK, Phebe ,   b. 20 Jan 1729, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1816, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     2. MACK, Deborah ,   b. 15 Sep 1730, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
    +3. MACK, Soloman Sr.   Additional Information on MACK, Soloman Sr. - I19655,   b. 15 Sep 1732, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Aug 1820, Gilsum, Cheshire, New Hampshire, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
     4. MACK, Hannah ,   b. 15 Oct 1734, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. MACK, Samuel ,   b. 15 Nov 1736, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Oct 1783, Queens, Nova Scotia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years)
     6. MACK, Hephzibah ,   b. 7 May 1740, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jun 1818, Marlow, Cheshire, New Hampshire, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     7. MACK, Stephen ,   b. 15 Jun 1742, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jun 1762, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 20 years)
     8. MACK, Captain Elisha Huntley   Additional Information on MACK, Captain Elisha Huntley - I52485,   b. 16 Jul 1745, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Nov 1820, Washington DC, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     9. MACK, Azubah ,   b. 28 Nov 1748, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jun 1816, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
    Last Modified 6 Oct 2020 
    Family ID F7980  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 8 Dec 1697 - Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 20 Apr 1728 - Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 8 May 1792 - Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 10 May 1792 - Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsWAC - 25 Nov 1909 - SLAKE Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Ebenezer and Hannah [Huntley] Mack
    Ebenezer and Hannah [Huntley] Mack

  • Notes 
    • Pastor, Second Congregational Church Reverend Submitted by Steve Lapp The other group are Germanic and most originated from parts of Germany or Switzerland during the Palatinate period of migration which was from the early to the late 1700's. Many of these came here to avoid religious persecution, serfdom at home, and forced conscription Most of this group entered America through Pennsylvania and other Southern parts and some of these who stayed in Pennsylvania became known as "Pennsylvania Dutch," ... Some of the very early Palatines in America came first to New York State to the region around the Hudson River, but by about the 1720's most were coming first to Pennsylvania. Most of the people supporting the Mock Family Historian are researching this latter group since many of their early ancestors were of Germanic heritage. It is not that they are not interested in the New England Mack families, but only for experience that little seems to be known about the New England Macks. This Germanic group is a rather ubiquitous one in that one is not able to trace to any single family, but there are multiple families who mostly originated from Germany, and many of these share the surname of Mack. One of our members, Steve Lapp, researched this and found that most of the Mock, Mack, Mauck, Mauk, and other similar variant spellings, who came early to America originated from the Rhine and Necar River Valleys of Germany. ... More information on Lucy Mack, mother of Joseph Smith (Mormon Leader), Lucy Mack was born 8 July 1776 at Gilsum, Cheshire, New Hampshire. Her father, Solomon Mack, born 15 Sept, 1732 at Lyme, New London, Conn. his father, Rev. Ebenezer Mack, born 8 Dec, 1697 at Lyme, New London, Conn. His Father, John Mack." Sherman Brown's e-mail address is [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] Paul Swan -------------------------------------- Prepared by Ross S. Whitney Ref: A Comprehensive History of The Church - Vol. One (REPEATED from FATHER's FILE and continued here pg. 17 and added pg. 18) 1. American Ancestry, vol. ii, p. 76. Five Colonial Families, vol. i, p. 343. 2. Five Colonial Families, vol. i. Appendix. See also History of the Town of Gilsum. N.H., p. 357. Here also is given the family tradition by Wm. Mack of Stanstead, Canada--"I have heard my father say he never knew a Mack convicted of any crime." Chapter II - The Ancestry of Joseph Smith, The Prophet - (Cont'd) On the maternal side the Prophet's ancestry cannot be traced beyond John Mack, who was born in 1653, in Inveresk, Scotland. He came to America about 1680, and settled in Lyme, Connecticut. 1734. The Prophet Joseph Smith descended from this man in the following line: II. The Macks of New England - The Macks came from Scotland, to Massachusetts, and then moved to Connecticut and on New Hampshire and Vermont and then on to Upstate New York.) --Ebenezer Mack, son of the above John Mack; --Solomon Mack, son of the above Solomon Mack, and mother of the Prophet. John Mack, Jr - In the History of Five Colonial Families, of which the Mack family is one, the following occurs: "It is thought that the Mack family dropped their original name, retaining the prefix only, thereby being better able to escape persecution on account of their religious belief. It is said that part of their coat-of arms was a boar's head. The Scotch families of McDougal and McTavish have as part of their coats-of-arms a boar's head erased. One branch of the family thinks that the original name was McDerman." Ebenezer Mack was born at Lyme, December 8th, 1697; and became pastor of the Second Congregational church at that place. He was a man of considerable property and lived in good style, commanding the respect and attention usually accorded those engaged in his calling, and who follow habits of strict morality. But after enjoying these advantages for a time, misfortunes overtook. Ebenezer Mack and the family once so comfortably situated, was scattered. ---------------------------------------------- Stephen Mack, Sr. What did Solomon Mack's son Stephen, who was born in Marlow, do after he left New Hampshire? Plenty! After young manhood in the area of Sharon, Vermont, he went West. In Michigan, he started a fur trade which he eventually sold to John Astor of the American Fur Company. He established a town. He built a road between Pontiac and Detroit, one end of which is Mack Avenue, still the main artery in Detroit today. General Marlow References Overviews of Marlow history, when approached with a fine toothed comb, often yield important clues. They are also helpful to those doing genealogical research Gazetteer on Marlow, N. H. Nineteenth century gazetteers take a different view than we might today. After an "Our Town" introduction to each town, (Gazetteers must be a source of Thornton Wilder's inspiration.) the authors summarize the stories of "important people." That would include successful framers and businessmen and probably the authors' friends. 1790 Census, Marlow, N. H. Our first national census shows about 65 heads of households in Marlow, most of them from Lyme, Connecticut and some from nearby Connecticut towns such as Saybrook, Haddam, Essex, and New London. (There were others not found by the census taker.) Most are interrelated. We can see it's a family affair! Marlow Historical Society Forum This interactive forum posts a great deal of information about Marlow, N. H. history including excerpts from early town records, stories of local conflicts, and some military information. The most popular part of the Forum is the genealogy section. The Forum is a work in progress with more information added as we discover it. Our Forum members have been most helpful in providing new information. Thank you, all out there! Calling All Genealogy Buffs These are the genealogical research starting places we have found most useful. N.H. - Cyndi's List For those who would like to explore the early and continued family links between Marlow, N. H. and Lyme, Connecticut, try Cyndi's List - New Hampshire. Cyndi's List is a list of genealogical lists, the most comprehensive of its kind. Connecticut - Cyndi's List For exploration of the early and continued family links between Marlow, N. H. and Lyme, Connecticut from the southern end, try Cyndi's List - Connecticut. Huntley Association "Notes on History of the Town of Marlow, N.H." by Elgin Jones. Sentinel Printing Co. Keene, N.H. 1941, shows on pp. xii and xii that ten Huntley heads of households purchased a total of 38 parcels of Marlow land between 1767 and 1826. These were all purchases from the original Proprietors to whom the Marlow grant was made. (There may have been more land transfers to Huntleys during this time, second-hand, so to speak.) These parcels range from one to 500 acres, but most are substantial, 40 to 100 acres. These Huntleys trace their ancestry back to John Huntley of Lyme, CT, mostly through his son Aaron. "Images of America: Old Lyme, Lyme, and Hadlyme" . Kathryn Burton . Arcadia Publishing shows two photographs of the rather grand Lyme Huntley homestead and informs us, "John Huntley received a grant from the British crown for a home lot on July 12, 1666." We find that, after passing out of the Huntley family, the house served as home for some of the wealthiest people in Lyme until it was demolished in 1898. Through generations Huntleys have been prominent in Marlow town affairs, and many of their descendants still live here. That is why we are providing a link to the Huntley Association. It, in turn, provides helpful links to Huntley genealogy and the affairs of the organization such as the annual national Huntley Reunion. Huntley Genealogy Forum Here is an extraordinary genealogy forum frequently posted by Virgil Huntley who has researched his family for a lifetime and written three volumes on the descendants of John Huntley of Lyme, Connecticut. Virgil has passed his ninetieth birthday. He shares a wealth of Huntley information. Mack Family Tree The Mack family in general has been unusual in its participation in bringing about the new American liberty and making good use of it. Although there are many resources on Mack genealogy, this one is particularly helpful because it allows us to see the entire family at a glance. This goes back to John Mack, an immigrant, which is as far as anyone has been able to follow so far. If you have an interest in the family, you will want to pursue it beyond this link, but this is a start. A Mack and Huntley Meeting Place Here is a link showing the relationship of these two important families as well as a connection to the famous seafaring Dewolf family of Rhode Island and Connecticut. Marlow's West Yard Burying Ground Here is a transcription of the inscriptions from Marlow's oldest cemetery in which the stones bear legible writing. In another cemetery, not far away, the stones either had no inscriptions or are no longer legible. The West Yard Cemetery is beside Baker's Corner, the location of Marlow's first settlement. Almost all of the people buried there were born in Lyme, Connecticut or are children of those born in Lyme. Virgil Huntley's History of John Huntley and His Descendants, Vol. 3 Volume 3 of this extensive, well-researched genealogy on the descendants of John Huntley is on the Aaron Huntley branch. It was Aaron Huntley, Jr. who came to live in Marlow joined by many of his family. JOHN HUNTLEY OF BOSTON & ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS AND LYME, CONNECTICUT, 1647-1996 AND SOME OF HIS DESCENDANTS BOOK III AARON LINE (Volume 3) by: Virgil W Huntley Marlow, New Grantham & Protectworth, Cheshire, County, NH 1790 Census Sorted By Head of Household. = Illegible The town of Lyme was set off from Saybrook (now known as Deep River), which is on the west bank of the river mouth, on February 13, 1665. Old Lyme was later incorporated from Lyme in 1855, but Old Lyme contains the oldest-settled portion of the Lymes sup[1] Old Lyme occupies about 27 square miles (70 km) of shoreline, tidal marsh, inland wetlands and forested hills. Its neighbor to the north is the Town of Lyme and to the east, East Lyme. Other place-names from the same root are Hadlyme, Connecticut (north of Lyme) and South Lyme (a beach resort area of Old Lyme). The place-name Lyme derives from Lyme Regis, a small port on the coast of Dorset, England from which it is believed the early settlers migrated in the 17th Century. [2] 1. Burton, K. Old Lyme, Lyme, and Hadlyme. Arcadia Publishing,Charleston, SC, 2003 pp. 7-8. 2. Caulkins, F.M. History of New London, Connecticut. From the first survey of the coast in 1612, to 1852. H.D. Utley, New London, 1895. 696 pp. 3. Principal communities Black Hall Laysville Lyme Station Old Lyme center Sound View South Lyme (06376) Edge Lea, Hatchetts Point, Point O'Woods Other minor communities and geographic features in the town are: Between the Rivers, Black Hall Pond, Brighton Beach, Ferry Road, Flat Rock Hill, Four Mile River, Griswold Point, Hall's Corners, Hawk's Nest Beach, Homestead Circle, Johnnycake Hill, Miami Beach, Mile Creek, Neck Road, Old Colony Beach, Old Lyme Estates, Old Lyme Shores, Rogers Lake, Sill Lane, Smith's Neck, Tantummaheag, Tuttles Sandy Beach, Whippoorwill, White Sand Beach. Ebenezer Mack, New Light Pedobaptist Marlow's Baptist preacher Ebenezer Mack (1716-1792) was not the Ebenezer Mack (1697-1777) who was husband of Hannah Huntley and father of Solomon Mack (See the Huntley family below. See Solomon Mack below.) Marlow's preacher, Ebenezer Mack, was Solomon Mack's cousin, married to Abigail (Hill) Davis and father of Silas Mack who died in Marlow in 1836. (Silas' daughter, Freelove Mack, died in Marlow in 1807.) The Mack family history is confusing because there were two John Macks and two Ebenezer Macks from Lyme, Connecticut. The first John Mack, immigrant from Scotland, married Sarah Bagley. He and Sarah had sons John and Ebenezer. This Ebenezer is Solomon Mack's father. This Ebenezer's brother John married Love Bennet, and the pair had a son, Ebenezer Mack. Influenced by the waves of the Great Awakening flooding Lyme, Connecticut, this Ebenezer Mack became a New Light preacher and moved from Lyme, Connecticut to Marlow, N. H. to preach the new Pedobaptist doctrine. He and Solomon Mack share the grandparents John Mack, Sr. and Sarah Bagley. By the way, there are two other Ebenezer Macks in New York State, one a newspaper editor in Ithica and one a miniaturist painter. Does anyone know if and how they are related to the Lyme/Marlow Ebenezer Macks? Find Marlow's Ebenezer Mack, the Pedobaptist preacher, in David Benedict's 1813 treatise "A General History of the Baptist Denomination in America..." (Lincoln and Edmands, London) under "Groton Union Conference". Ref: The Refiner's Fire by John L. Brooke - A Prepared People - Something of Our Ancestors pg 85 If the sectarian environment of coastal Connecticut had shaped this visionary familial spiritualism, we can also trace a number of paths by which Rogerene influences in particular might have reached these families. The north Lyme parish petitioners and Separates included a nephew of John Rogers, the founding Rogerene, and two cousins of a Rogerene outliver in neighboring Colchester. Solomon Mack's brother Elisha married into one of these Rogerene-connected families. In east Lyme, a branch of Valentine Wightman's sixth Principle Baptist church was disrupted by Rogerene beliefs in the 1730s, and such sentiments might well have lingered among the people attending Ebenezer Mack's open-communion Baptist church. In 1733 Ebenezer, grandson of John Mack Jr., married a widow, Abigail Fox Davis, the niece of Rogerenes, Samuel and Bathsheba Fox. Thus the Macks themselves had several direct connections to Rogerene "perfectionism". (Footnote 94 John R. Bolles and Anna B. Williams, The Rogerenes (Boston, 1904), 276; McLouglin, New England Dissent, I:260-I; Rogers, comp., James Rogers of New London, 41-2; John C. Cooley, Rathbone Genealogy (Syracuse, 1898), 708; Stone, Jasper Griffing, 9, 17. For Abigail Fox, see Smith, Ancestry and Posterity, 58; Diane D. Ivins and Aileen S. Freeman, The Fox Genealogy (n.p., 1982), 208-210)) ----------------------------- Revivalism and Separatism in New England, 1740-1800 Strict Congregationalist and Separate Baptists in the Great Awakening (1962) ID: I05638 Name: John Mack Sex: M Birth: 1669 in Scotland Death: 1734 in Lyme, Connecticut Reference Number: 682a(1)2 Reference Number: A682g(1)2 Note: http://www.familytreemaker.com History of the Treman, Tremaine, Truman Family in America vol1 11800. JOHN MACK. He was born in 1669 in Scotland) - He came to America about 1680, was at Salisbury, Conn., in 1681, and settled at Lyme, Conn., in 1697. He married (1st), April 5, 1681, Sarah Bagley at Salisbury, Conn. He married (2nd), May 4, 1733, Abigail Daniel, a widow. He died in 1734, at Lyme, Conn. Residence, Lyme, Conn. Children: 11801. John. Born April 29, 1682, at Salisbury, Conn. 11820. 11802. Sarah. Born in 1684 at Salisbury. Married Matthew Smith. 11910. Elizabeth. Born between 1682 and 1693, at Salisbury. Married 11803. Jonathan Reed. 11917. 11804. Lydia. Born between 1682 and 1693 at Salisbury. 11805. Josiah. Born in 1693 at Salisbury. 11840. 11806. Jonathan. Born between 1693 and 1697 at Salisbury. 11850. 11807. Orlando. Born between 1693 and 1697 at Salisbury. 11870. 11808. Ebenezer. Born Dec. 8, 1697, at Lyme, Conn. 11890. 11809. Mary. Born Nov. 10, 1699, at Lyme. Married, April 3, 1717, John Peters, at Hebron, Conn. 11810. Rebecca. Born Oct. 4, 1701, at Lyme. Married Caleb Benit, Jr. 11920. 11811. Johanna. Born Sept. 17, 1703, at Lyme. 11812. Deborah. Born Oct. 11, 1706, at Lyme. Married Theophilus Lord. 11930. Marriage 1 Sarah Bagley Married: 5 APR 1681 in Salisbury, Connecticut Children 1. Ebenezer Mack b: 8 DEC 1697 in Lyme, Connecticut ("bringing in the wood"). Mack genealogy : the descendants of John Mack of Lyme, Conn. with appendix containing genealogy of allied families, etc. About this book Source: Original data: Martin, Sophia Smith,. Mack genealogy : the descendants of John Mack of Lyme, Conn. with appendix containing genealogy of allied families, etc. Rutland, Vt.: Tuttle Co., 1903. Notes: Includes index Subjects: Mack family. Mack, John, 1653-1721. Table of Contents ntbl Vol I. Front matter Title page The name Mack in Lyme--who was the first? Care of cemeteries Hunting up ancestors First generation Descendants of John Mack, Jr. Descendants of Sarah Mack Descendants of Elizabeth Mack Descendants of Lydia Mack Descendants of Josiah Mack Descendants of Orlando Mack Descendants of Ebenezer Mack Descendants of Mary Mack (called Marah) Vol II Front matter Title page Descendants of Rebecca Mack Descendants of Joanna Mack Descendants of Deborah Mack Descendants of Jonathan Mack Index Back matter Index to appendix --------------------------------------------- Author: Goen, C. C Pg. 72 Separates formed churches in all three parishes of Lyme. In the First Church, Jonathan Parsons conversion to revivalistic Calvinism and his zeal in itinerant evangelizing evoked dissatisfaction among his conservative members. 81 They contrived his dismissal in October 1745, and the next year the prorevival party withdrew to form a Separate congregation. On December 25, 1746, they ordained John Fuller, one of their number, as pastor. He remained through various vicissitudes until 1759, when he assumed the leadership of the Separate church at Bean Hill (Norwich). The church at Lyme probably became extinct soon afterward. In the second parish (East Lyme) a Separate church was formed in 1749 under Ebenezer Mack. Three years later this church became Baptist in a body. In the third parish (North Lyme) some Separates organized a church at Grassy Hill in 1755 and Daniel Miner served as pastor from 1757 until his death in 1799. At Hadlyme, which in 1742 had been set off from North Lyme and Haddam as a regular parish, there was a Separate meeting which included some thirty families by 1768. Religious conditions in the town of Lyme that year were described in typical gossipy style by Ezra Stiles: In Lyme are seven Gongs 4 of the regular standing Chhs. 3 of the Separates of which two are Baptists. But the paed separates in the Vicinity of the Bapt. attend the Baptist Teachers, & I think the Bapt. allow some Paedob. to partake in Lord's. Supper. . . . The E. or 2d Par. had no Min. since Mr. Griswold s Death 1760. The Majority being partly Bap. & partly Sep. both fond * of exemption from Rates. ... [In 1746 the first parish] consisted of about 120 Fam. of which 16 or 18 Separates, the most of them Baptists, & formed a Bap. Chh. The Sep. in Mr. Beckwith s [North] Society are between a Quarter & Third of the Parish. Most or Majority of East Parish are Bapt. & Separates. Hence perhaps One Third of the whole Town may be Sep. & Baptists. 82 page 252-253 The other main area of Separate Baptist activity on the north western frontier is the Connecticut River Valley. Much of this territory was settled by people from eastern Connecticut, and a good proportion of them were religious radicals. In 1768 Ebenezer Mack and a large group of his Separate Baptist congregation from East Lyme moved to Marlow, New Hampshire. Caleb Blood, from the Separate Baptist church at Charlton (West Leicester), Massachusetts, became pastor here in 1777 and wrote about the spiritual destitution of the region to the Warren Association, which in 1779 sent two evangelists on a mission up the Valley. The missionaries it selected for this purpose were both Separate Baptists: Biel Ledoyt of West Woodstock, Connecticut, and Job Seamans of Attleborough, Massachusetts. They preached up both sides of the Connecticut River as far as Woodstock, Vermont, a little below Eleazar Wheelock s new school at Hanover, New Hampshire, and from their labors came several new Baptist churches. A church organized in 1778 at Croydon, New Hampshire, united in 1790 with a group of Baptists in Newport and called Ledoyt to return as their pastor. He remained fourteen years. New London, New Hampshire, formed a church in 1788 and persuaded Seamans to come as pastor; he remained until his death in 1830. The Rhode Island element was strong here also, as these place names suggest. Westmoreland, New Hampshire, was settled in 1771 by a group from Isaac Backus church in Middleborough. A church was organized shortly afterward, and Ebenezer Bailey ordained its pastor on November 30, 1773. Further up the river, Lebanon was settled by New Light Congregationalists under the Rev. Isaiah Potter, but soon afterward, in June 1771, a Baptist church was formed here under Jedediah Hibbard. The Baptist church formed in Canaan in 1783 introduces a link back to the Separate Baptists of the older territories: its pastor from 1783 to 1790 was the celebrated Thomas Baldwin, who was born in Bozrah, Connecticut, in 1753, brought by his family to Canaan in 1769, converted by Baptist evangelists in 1780, and baptized by Elisha Ransom of Woodstock in 1781. In 1790 he went to the Second Baptist Church of Boston for a fruitful ministry which lasted until his death in 1825. --------------------------- ROGERENES (1716-1720) Just an example of their strict rules. Rogerenes aroused by attempts at more strict enforcement of the ecclesiastical laws. A countermove. Specious public promise of Governor Saltonstall. Arrest of Sarah, wife of John Bolles, for "breach of sabbath." She rebukes the judge for his unjust verdict. Her long imprisonment. Court scene relating to the imprisonment of Sarah Bolles. John Rogers declares the indictment in this trial to be a false charge and has the sympathy of the jury. Sarah Bolles loses her child in prison and lies at the point of death. She is rescued from the prison, by a party of friends and sympathizers, and carried home on a bed. ------------------------------ Google Books Online Copies (All needs further research that is downloaded here.) Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut 1665-1677 on Google Books Volume 10 Volume 7 Volume 3 New England families, genealogical and memorial: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of commonwealths and the founding of a nation by William Richard Cutter Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1915 1863 Salisbury. Edward Elbridge and Evelyn Me Curdy Salisbury. Family histories and genealogies, a series of genealogical and biographical monographs on the families of MacCurdy, Mitchell, Lord Lynde, Digby, Newdigate, Hoo, Willoughby, Griswold, Wolcolt, Pitkin, Ogden, Johnson, Diodati, Lee and Marvin and notes on the families of Buchanan, Parmelee, Boardman, Lay, Locke, Cole, DeWolf, Drake, Bond and Swayne, Dunbar and Clarke and a notice of Chief Justice Morrison Remick Wa1te, with twenty-nine pedigree charts and two charts of combined descents, in five volumes. Port. Clo., folio. N. p. (New Haven), privately printed, 1892. Also, Salisbury family memorials ; a series of genealogical and biographical monographs of the families of Salisbury, Aldworth-Eldridge, Sewall, etc. 2 vols. Privately printed, N. p., 1885. In all 7 vols. 1863* Salisbury family memorials. A series of genealogical and biographical monographs of the families of Salisbury, Aldworth-Eldridge, Sewall, Pyldren-Dum- mer, Walley, Quincy, Gookin, Wendell, Breese, Chevalier Anderson and Phillips. With fifteen pedigrees and an appendix, by Edward E. Salisbury. Folio. Clo. 2 vols. Privately printed. N. p., 1885. $22.50 1889 Savage, James. Genealogical dictionary of the first settlers of New England, showing three generations of those who came before May, 1692, on the basis of Farmer's Register. Clo. 4 vols. Boston, 1860-62. "This book presents us with the outline of American genealogy and one that is nearly complete, We have herein the names of a great proportion of the settlers previous to 1692. Prior to this publication we had no guide as to the extent of existing information. When we wish to trace any given name, Mr. Savage's Dictionary will be our first resource, and if wanting there, one other authority remains to be appealed to (the New England Historical and Genealogical Register), after which all but the most enthusiastic will rest assured that the family is of recent origin and will take other well-known methods to trace it. one other prominent excellence of his work remains to be stated: as he has embraced all of New England in his plan of investigation, he has been able to collect thedifferent settlers of the same name from its primal root here : a branch disappears, and no clew points whither, but this book will probably show its locality if in New England and give information which otherwise would be absolutely unattainable, We may conclude, then, that Mr Savage has conferred upon every genealogist a boon which can be estimated when we state that no public library, perhaps no private one, possesses all the printed works from which he has gathered information ; and an exploration of his manuscript authorities is a task for which few can afford the time or expense," - S. G. Drakb. 1889* Savage. Genealogical notes and errata, applying to Savage's Genealogical Dictionary, by Mrs. C. H. Dall. Stitched. 8 pp. Brockway, Wolston, who settled in Lyme, Ct., ca. 1660. Genealogy of branch of his descend, in line of Thomas of Columbia, Ct., by A. N. Brockway, M. D. Bds., 34 pp. Watertown, 1888. Hoyt, Haight and Hight families, with account of earlier Hyatt families, a list of first settlers of Salisbury and Amesbury, Mass., etc., by D. W. Hoyt. Ports., illus. Clo., 686 pp. Providence, 1871. 604 De Wolf. Charles D'Wolf, of Guadaloupe, his ancestors and descendants, being a complete genealogy of the " Rhode Island D'Wolfs ", the descendants of Simon DeWolf, with their common descent from Balthasar De Wolf, of Lyme, Conn., (1668), with a biographical introduction and appendices on the Nova Scotian de Wolfs and other allied families, by Calbraith B. Perry. Ports., illus., coat of arms. % mor., uncut, 324 pp. N. Y., 1902. $10.00 K- 6115 Dexter. Genealogy, 1642-1904. Descendants of Richard, of Maiden, Mass., from the notes of J. H. Dexter and original researches by O. P. Dexter. View of the Dexter mansion. Clo., 279 pp. N. Y., 1904. $7.50 1560 Olin. Record of the John Olin family, the first of that name which came to America in the year 1678. By C. C. Olin. Ports. Clo., 323 pp. Indianapolis, 1893. $7.50 839 Genealogical Records. Manuscript entries of births, deaths and marriages, taken from family Bibles, 1581-1917, by J. F.-J. Robinson & H. C. Bartlett. Ports., illus. Clo., uncut, 331 pp. 200 copies printed by Colonial Dames of N. Y. N. Y., 1917. 2207 Treman, Tremaine, Truman family in America; with the related families of Mack, Dey, Board and Ayers ; being a history of Joseph Truman of New London, Conn. (1666); John Mack of Lyme, Conn. (1680); Richard Dey of New York City (1641); Cornelius Board of Boardville, N. J. (1730); John Ayer of Newbury, Mass. , (1635) ; and their descendants, by E. M. Treman and M. E. Poole. Ports., illus., coats of arms. Clo., 2 vols. 2129 pp. Ithaca, 1901. $15.00 Champion. A history of the descendants of Henry, of Saybrook and Lyme, Conn., by F. B. Trowbridge. Clo., 588 pp. New Haven, 1891. $5.00 Mack. Descendants of John, of Lyme, Conn. With appendix containing genealogy of allied families, etc. By Sophia (Smith) Martin. Clo., 1788 pp. 2 vols. Rutland, 1903. $10.00 Macy Genealogy from 1635-1868. By S. J. Macy. Portraits. Clo., 457 pp. Albany, 1868. $10.00 Ely. Lineage of Richard, of Plymouth, England, who came to Boston, Mass., about 1655, and settled at Lyme, Conn., in 1660, by Moses 8. Beach and Rev. William Ely, edited and enlarged by George B. Vanderpoel, with a sketch of the origin and history of the Elyes of Utterby and of Wonston, by Sumner A. Ely. Ports., illus., facsimilies, pedigree charts. Clo., 639 pp. N. Y., 1902. $10.00 1825 Rogers. The John Rogers families in Plymouth and vicinity. By J. H. Drummond. Wrappers, 26 pp. N. p., 1895. $1.5" 1826 Rogers. James Rogers, of Londonderry, and James Rogers of Dunbarton. Bds., 12 pp. N. p., 1897. $1.50 1827 Rogers, John, of Marshfield, and some descend., by Josiah H. Drummond. Wrappers, 194 pp. Portland, 1898. $2.50 1828 Rogers. James Rogers of New London, Ct., and his descendants, by Jas. S. Rogers. Illus. Clo., 514 pp. Boston, 1902. I?-5C 1829 Rogers. The Rogerenes. Some hitherto unpublished annals belonging to the colonial history of Conn. Part I. A. Vindication, by John R. Bolles. Part II. History of the Rogerenes, by Anna B. Williams. Clo., 396 pp. Boston, 1904. $5.00 1830 Rogers, John, families in Plymouth and vicinity, by J. H. Drummond. Bds., 27 pp. 2nd rev. ed. N. p., n. d. $2.00 1831 Rogers family of the County of Essex, Eng., and Essex County, Mass., by Henry F. Waters. A chart. (Excerpt). $1.00 1832 Rogers. Genealogical memoir of the family of Rev. Nathaniel Rogers of Ipswich, Mass., who came to New Eng., 1636. Wrappers, 83pp. (Excerpt). $5.00 1833 Rogers. Hope Rogers and his descendants, by James S. Rogers. Boston, 1901. Wrappers, 6 pp. (Excerpt). . f1.25 DEATH: Also shown as Died 8 May 1777 ~SEALING_PARENTS: Also shown as SealPar 25 May 1985, PROVO.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1091] International Genealogical Index(R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, downloaded 20 Jun 2009 (Reliability: 3).

    2. [S1091] International Genealogical Index(R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, citing microfilm 184104, page 59, reference number 2114, downloaded 21 May 2009 (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S1091] International Genealogical Index(R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, downloaded 16 Sep 2006 (Reliability: 3).

    4. [S1091] International Genealogical Index(R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, citing microfilm 1553652 for batch F516228, sheet 014, downloaded 16 Sep 2006 (Reliability: 3).

    5. [S1091] International Genealogical Index(R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, citing microfilm 1395945 for batch 8494201, sheet 26, downloaded 13 Nov 2009 (Reliability: 3).